The Book Club

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Edmund0Dantes
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Re: The Book Club

Post by Edmund0Dantes »

Its the amount of storage space i was thinking of.

IE. We're running out of space in the house of put books - whilst still being able to live in it. :lol: We automaticlly buy all the new Terry Pratchett books, all the new Anne McAffrey books, whilst at the same time we have a lot of books (IE the HG Wells collection) that a bulky set, theres others that pop up from time to time.

Alos airlines seem to be continuing their trend of downsizing the luggage allowence - that even applies to decent ones like KLM/Air France/BA etc as well as the budget airlines. Myself and the other half have to plan what books we are taking in advance.

I thought that having a shared amazon kindle account, and the ability to lend/share books with friends might reduce the issues we have. (The shred account would mean that out main accounts were still 'private').

Hmmmm, I'll be over in the late lounge pondering this some more. :geek:

cracker
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Re: The Book Club

Post by cracker »

Surely I could not fondle a kindle...Will not even give it a capital k.

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Libelula
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Re: The Book Club

Post by Libelula »

I've not read all the way back through this thread, so forgive me if I'm repeating other people!

I thought I'd be a traditionalist but I love love love my KIndle! It has changed the way I read, what I read (all those free books, esp 19th Century classics!) and the amount of time I spend reading - ie a lot more!

My Kindle has been helpful too in the fight against the EAF - there are quite a few books on alcoholism available on KIndle and I can read then anytime, any place, in total privacy - though it does mean that I've password-protected it.

Kindle books I've read on alcoholism, all helpful in very different ways:

Goodbye Mr Wonderful - Chris McCully
Can I stop drinking? Changing your life in Alcoholics Anonymous - Jerry B
Alcoholic Thinking: Language, Culture and Belief in Alcoholics Anonymous - Danny M Wilcox

I also pick up wifi on my Kindle so can use it to check my Facebook. (I don't think it can support Brighteye, unfortunately!)

Lib
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Ladysnoops
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Re: The Book Club

Post by Ladysnoops »

I'm an avid reader.....read every night....can't fall asleep unless I've read for at least an hour. So far I am resisting the Kindle ;) I like to touch and smell my books....they give me comfort :) Maybe I'll borrow someone's Kindle and see what I think, but I don't think they are for me. Of course I never thought I'd become a Crackberry either (addicted to my Blackberry) :oops:

Happy reading everyone......such a great tool in our toolbox to stay sober (::)

Linda
Success is the sum of small efforts repeated day in and day out.

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enoughisenough
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Re: The Book Club

Post by enoughisenough »

I Love reading too - and it is sooo much easier when sober, no more squinting through one eye trying to stop the words blurring!! I was up reading til nearly 1 am last night,just a historical paperback but I thought then - this is the life :D
Yesterday I was clever, I wanted to change the world. Today I am wiser and am changing myself ~ Rumi

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Ladysnoops
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Re: The Book Club

Post by Ladysnoops »

Oh yes, I know all about the squinty eye thing ;) But what was worse for me was the fact that I would have to re-read stuff because I could not remember what I had read the night before :oops: :oops:

I was up until about 12:30 am reading.......started a new Patricia Cornwell book......love her stuff ;)?

Linda
Success is the sum of small efforts repeated day in and day out.

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Willy
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Re: The Book Club

Post by Willy »

Ian Rankin's "The Complaints" is a good read for those of us searching for a better life without alcohol. The main character, Malcom Fox, is a moral and competent Edinburgh detective who gave up "tippling" a few years back. Fox deals with the challenges and temptations of living dry without letting it emasculate him. He often appears to savor being clean and sober but is still aware of the whispers of the EAF.

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enoughisenough
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Re: The Book Club

Post by enoughisenough »

Thanks Willy

That sounds really apt, I will look out for it ;)?

EiE
Yesterday I was clever, I wanted to change the world. Today I am wiser and am changing myself ~ Rumi

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caroline95
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Re: The Book Club

Post by caroline95 »

I love Ian Rankin's books, but I haven't read 'The Complaints', so thanks for the recommendation Willy, I'll look out for that one.

Another of my favourite 'recovering alcoholic detective' characters is Matthew Scudder, in a series of novels by Lawrence Block.One called 'When the Sacred Ginmill Closes' stays in my mind as particularly good, I might just go and reserve it from the library to read again.

I'm currently reading Lionel Shriver's 'So Much For That'.The subject matter is a bit depressing, but she writes so well you can't help bur really care about the characters and what happens to them.So even though it's quite a long haul of a read, I'll keep going to the bitter end!

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Willy
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Re: The Book Club

Post by Willy »

Thank you Caroline,

The local library did not have When the Sacred Ginmill Closes, but I just bought a copy on eBay. I'm looking forward to getting started with it.

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caroline95
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Re: The Book Club

Post by caroline95 »

I hope you enjoy getting to know Matt Scudder Willy, I've always found him to be an interesting character.Coincidentally, I was browsing around the book shelves in a charity shop to-day and found another Lawrence Block novel, 'A Walk Among the Tombstones'.I thought I'd read all the Matt Scudder stories, but this one didn't ring any bells, so I snapped it up for 20p - bargain!

I'm coming to the end of the Lionel Shriver book now, and though it's been a bit of a long haul, I'll be sorry when I reach the last page.The mark of a good book for me is when it grabs my interest on the first page, and makes me a bit sad to say goodbye when I reach the end.

Happy reading, everyone!

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thetodolist
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Re: Good reads, poems and quotes

Post by thetodolist »

Kick up the fire, and let the flames break loose
To drive the shadows back;
Prolong the talk on this or that excuse....

Philip Larkin
Fall seven times, stand up eight.

Giving up doesn't always mean you are weak, sometimes it just means you're strong enough to let go.

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Libelula
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Re: Good reads, poems and quotes

Post by Libelula »

I'm reposting this here just in case it's helpful to anyone. Also, I want to help keep this thread going - I'm always looking for good book suggestions to help fight the EAF.

I do find that reading about alcohol / addiction, when combined with Brighteye visits, act together to help keep me motivated. Last month I always had a book about alcohol, the AA, beating addiction, etc, on the go.

==================================

I read the Alan Carr book too, some months back, and I found it very eye-opening to see things presented to simply and persuasively.

However, in hindsight I think it was a little simplistic, and failed to fully address the fact that often alcoholism is covering over other problems, and that one has to recover in a wider, more existential sense. This is where I think I'm at now, and finding it quite hard and scary...

I think you need different ideas at different times, but a couple of years ago a book that really helped me was "Overcoming Problem Drinking" by Marcantonio Spada. It really helped me examine my habits, when/where/why I drink (I was still at the broadbrush 'I am maybe drinking a bit much' stage). It also helped scotch my completely unrealistic expectations that I would stop drinking completely at the first attempt - and that I **shouldn't indulge in negative self-criticism** when this normal not-completely-successful outcome happened!

Advice like drawing up a drinking diary, keeping encouraging flashcards in your handbag.... it all made me realise that cutting down on alcohol would be more complicated than I anticipated, and that in fact I would need a whole toolkit of micro-strategies, which I am still working on.

He does also address the whole cutting down / cutting out debate - and warns just how difficult it is to maintain moderation. I think he says either 3 or 6 months of abstention should be your absolute minimum before considering moderate drinking. That's what I think I'm should aim at - and hoping my knuckles don't get too white along the way! The problem is: if giving up alcohol is easy, why bother drinking anyway? If giving up alcohol is hard, you shouldn't be drinking...

Sorry, just more displacement activity.

Lib
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hamster2
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Re: Good reads, poems and quotes

Post by hamster2 »

Libelula wrote:The problem is: if giving up alcohol is easy, why bother drinking anyway? If giving up alcohol is hard, you shouldn't be drinking...

Sorry, just more displacement activity.

Lib
Thats it in a nutshell really Lib isnt it ;) . Its very complicsted. Its why so many struggle to stop, I have contributed to the weath of a lot of people over the years with all the self help books I bought :roll: . Mainly the internet was all I needed to quench my curiosity about myself and my addiction. I did keep a drinking diary in the very early days. x

Digga - thanks for the song idea. I did a search on you tube and must had typed something wrong because I found this instead which made me smile this morning.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fycGFGSe ... 40AF37AD15

If you dont like links then type 'Flight of the Conchords Ep 4 Sello Tape ' into you tube.

'life is like a roll of sellotape' - I get that ;) .

Julie
x

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Willy
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Re: The Book Club

Post by Willy »

Thanks for suggesting "When the Sacred Ginmill Closes", Caroline; enjoyed it very much. I'm nearly complete with "Goodbye Mr. Wonderful" by Chris McCully. Very real first-hand look at recovery, so real to be grim at times. I find it not only powerfully sobering (and I do need all the sobering I can devour) but a source of optimism as well. It's affected my perspective on alcohol abuse, in general and my own.

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caroline95
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Re: The Book Club

Post by caroline95 »

Hi Willy, 'glad you enjoyed 'When the Sacred Gin Mill Closes'.

I love personal stories written by people who have survived addiction too - as you say, they can be such a source of optimism.

My favourites are:

Caroline Knapp - 'Drinking - A Love Story

William Augusten - 'Dry'

William Leith - 'Hunger'

I'm off to look for Chris McCully on Amazon now, thanks for the recommendation.

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Willy
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Re: The Book Club

Post by Willy »

You're welcome Caroline, ' hope things are well. I would like to know your perspective on "The Complaints" if you get around to reading it. I'm going to take a reading break tonight and plan to watch Days of Wine and Roses. I think Chris mentioned it in his book. I look forward to exploring your other suggestions.

Best wishes...

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caroline95
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Re: The Book Club

Post by caroline95 »

Dab, the first time I met you was on this thread - fab to see you here again.I've read your posts on the forum and am in awe of how you've dealt with so much, yet still found the time and energy to support other people.You rock, wee fish of many colours.

'Days of Wine and Roses/Lost Week-end - both brilliant films, but quite harrowing.

I'm off to bed now, with a Bill Bryson to cheer me up - 'A Walk In the Woods' never fails!

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Willy
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Re: The Book Club

Post by Willy »

Just finished The Days of Wine and Roses and I'm stunned. I'm looking at all the white on the screen and though I try, I can think of nothing more to say.

I can say that I just ordered "Dry" and "Drinking - A Love Story". Not in our library; thank the Lord for eBay.

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Willy
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Re: The Book Club

Post by Willy »

My internal dialogue after experiencing Days of Wine and Roses goes something like this:

1) You've been playing a very dangerous game; if you don't stop you will soon go down very hard.
2) It's time to stop scratching around with this problem; if you let it, it wil destroy you.
3) Life is better sober than it is drunk or hungover.

I'm going to my first AA meeting this afternoon and am actually looking forward to it!

And Dab, how wonderful it is that you come here to support and share. My first step out of the hole that I had been digging for decades was stumbling (hungover; not drunk) upon BE a few months ago. And I even like the title 'Stillness Speaks' , thank you.

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