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The Book Club

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Jschroeder214
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The Book Club

Post by Jschroeder214 » 30 Jul 2011 00:39

Steven pressfield
There is no fear. There is only choice.

Jillywinks
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Re: The Book Club

Post by Jillywinks » 31 Jul 2011 19:40

I have just finished reading the Virgins Lover which is about Queen Elizabeth I by Philippa Gregory, which was brilliant. I was looking at the Boleyn Girl so now you have recommended it it looks like that is next on the list.

Thanks Fiz

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Re: Good reads, poems and quotes

Post by thetodolist » 07 Aug 2011 23:12

"One doesn't discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time."
Andre Gide

"Decide that you want it more than you are afraid of it."
Bill Cosby

"It's never too late to be what you might have been."
George Eliot

"A hero is one who knows how to hang on one minute longer."
Norwegian proverb
Fall seven times, stand up eight.

Giving up doesn't always mean you are weak, sometimes it just means you're strong enough to let go.

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Re: Good reads, poems and quotes

Post by Mark. » 07 Aug 2011 23:38

That's a fabulous poem, SB! Thanks, I'd never read it before. I'm afraid I only know Masefield for The Box of Delights!

I love those quotes, Amy! And I will think of the Andre Gide one tomorrow, when we set off on holiday!
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Re: Good reads, poems and quotes

Post by Boris Bike » 12 Aug 2011 06:37

There once was an alkie called Bike
Twas himself that he didn't much like
He signed up to a site
And he's doing all right
(The waiting list's long for a psych).

Though only on day number one
It feels like something's begun
A stranger to bed
Often what's said
Is posted absent the sun.

Forever a cynical man
He's not used to saying "I can"
But helped on the net
He is willing to bet
He'll flush EAF down the pan.

So thank you to all at BE
For the friendly posts that I see
I wish you all well
And I hope you can tell
You're all of such great help to me

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Mark.
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Re: Good reads, poems and quotes

Post by Mark. » 14 Aug 2011 19:04

Hey Joanne - did you write this? (I knows you write good poetry 'cos I have a long memory. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think you shared some last summer? I seem to remember it was very good.)

Anyway, I loved this - especially the last line.

Keep reading, start thinking, and then start writing some more stuff for us to read, won't you?

Hi Unicorn! Your mention of meditation the other week has inspired me to do some reading/re-reading. I've just begun The Cloud of Unknowing. (I'd like to say I'm re-reading this but that would be a terrible fib as I've never before really got beyond the first few chapters :roll: ).

It's an anonymous fourteenth century Christian work, but it strikes me that there are a lot of similarities between the mystic/meditative strands of most religions/philosophies, so I'd be really interested in reading some Buddist works next, or anything from other religions. I might have to pester you for some recommendations!

Mark <:)>
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Re: Good reads, poems and quotes

Post by Mark. » 14 Aug 2011 19:32

The retreat sounds fabulous, Unicorn! I'll be really interested to hear how it goes.

Thanks - I just noticed the Meditation thread. I'm going to read up the Chopra Centre challenge in a few minutes.
Unicorn wrote:But for now, spirituality goes beyond the person and extends to all people, sending them loving thoughts regardless of faith or creed, totally non-judgemental, just like BE ethics.
I couldn't agree more!

Have a lovely evening, Unicorn!
Mark <:)>
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Boris Bike
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Re: Good reads, poems and quotes

Post by Boris Bike » 14 Aug 2011 19:39

This is the only Buddhism site you're ever likely to need:

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/

This is a good place to start:

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/ptf/index.html

There's translations of many of the suttas. But there's also a great many articles by modern writers too. Some of the suttas are quite repetitive. That can either be relaxing or rather tedious, depending on mood. The more modern articles, which I find very good, are here:

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/index-subject.html

A particular subject that may help many in our struggle is that of 'Mindfulness' ('Sati' in Pali - the language of the Buddhist canon):

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/index-subject.html#sati

Glad you inspired me to return to that site. <:)> I need a refresher on mindfulness myself so I shall be reading those again.

Another thing you might like to Google is "Buddhist audio". There's quite a few sites out there with free sound files. They can be rather patchy in terms of interestingness of the talk and sound quality. I found this one of the better places to go:

http://www.dharmaseed.org/talks/

And there's also plenty of audio by the guy that runs Access To Insight and I seem to recall he's quite good

http://www.audiodharma.org/teacher/16/

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Boris Bike
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Re: Good reads, poems and quotes

Post by Boris Bike » 14 Aug 2011 19:57

Whoops. Couple of points. Here is the link for the modern articles:

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/index-author.html

The one I previously gave was for ALL the pages on the site, not just modern writings.

Also, on Access To Insight the word Mindfulness is not used in the way it is with modern therapies. For the more populist, widely heard about therapeutic version you'd have to look elsewhere. Access To Insight provides more on the strictly Buddhist interpretation.

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Re: Good reads, poems and quotes

Post by Boris Bike » 14 Aug 2011 21:32

Last post on Mindfulness, as I realise I've gone off-topic rather, but the video at the bottom of this page (not the top one) is a very good introduction. I was just browsing for info. The lady in the video was my therapist for a few months! She tried a few mad things on me, which rather put me off, but this video is a good introduction. The title says it's about mindfulness in coaching, but it isn't.

http://www.mindfulnet.org/page2.htm

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Re: Good reads, poems and quotes

Post by Mark. » 14 Aug 2011 21:56

These links look really interesting - thanks Boris! ;)?

Oddly enough, Unicorn, my wife and I were cycling a couple of weeks ago and we sort of inadvertantly stopped and started chatting to a lady out walking her dogs. She mentioned a Buddist teaching in the course of the conversation and I kind of gathered she was a practising Buddist.

I really enjoyed the chat and it might just have been coincidence but she was one of those people you feel a great deal calmer and serene for having met. Hm... it's all beginning to make me wonder! I have, of course, met Christians like that, as well as Muslims. Atheists too. And so on... I guess it's all a question of how centred a person is - how they achieve that, though, is the interesting question. I shall have a bath in a minute and ponder these things in depth!

Anyway, something else the lady told us was the Story of Gellert, which I vaguely remembered hearing as a child. The way the story came up in conversation was all a bit random so it felt rather mysterious or mystical, as though she was trying to tell us a parable or impart some nugget of great wisdom, the relevance of which would only become apparent to us at a later date. Well, that date hasn't arrived yet! However, I enjoyed the story. It's a bit random to bung it down here, but as it's the Good Reads thread, I will do and you can see what you think. I found a version on the web that suggests it's from Welsh folklore. However, it's also very akin to a fable of Aesop's. I've changed it a wee bit, to tell it like the lady so it has a happier ending than the versions I just found.

The Story of Gellert

Prince Llewellyn had a favorite greyhound named Gellert that was as gentle as a lamb at home but a lion in the chase. A day came when a large wolf roamed the land, attacking livestock, and a hunt was called in order to flush it out and kill it. Llewellyn blew his horn in front of his castle and all his dogs came to the call, including Gellert. However, Llewellyn had decided that Gellert was of greater use to him at home, where the hound could guard his young family, the prince's infant son in particular. Gellert, the swiftest and boldest of the pack, hung his head, realising he was to miss out on the hunt. However, he accepted his master's instruction to return to the house and Prince Llewellyn went off to the hunt without Gellert. Yet, he had little sport that day precisely because Gellert was not there, and because of this the ferocious wolf evaded the hunters.

Llewellen turned back in disappointment to his castle and, as he came to the gate, who should he see but Gellert come bounding out to meet him. But when the hound came near him, the prince was startled to see that his lips and fangs were dripping with blood. Llewellyn started back and the hound crouched down at his feet as if surprised or afraid at the way his master greeted him.

Now Prince Llewellyn's thoughts turned to his little son of just a year old, and his thoughts compelled him to rush towards the child's nursery. And the nearer he came the more blood and disorder he found about the rooms. He rushed into it and found the child's cradle overturned and daubed with blood.

Prince Llewellyn grew more and more terrified, and sought for his little son everywhere. He could find him nowhere but only signs of some terrible conflict in which much blood had been shed. At last he felt sure the dog had destroyed his child, and shouted to Gellert: "Monster, thou hast devoured my child!" As the prince drew out his sword, the hound gave a deafening cry, as if to gain his master's mercy.

As Gellert raised his yell, a little child's cry answered it from beneath the cradle, and there Llewellyn found his child unharmed and just awakened from sleep. But just beside him lay the body of a great gaunt wolf all torn to pieces and covered with blood. Almost too late, Llewellyn learned what had happened while he was away. Gellert had indeed stayed behind to guard the child and had fought and slain the wolf that had tried to destroy Llewellyn's heir.


I prefer the happier ending, personally. I keep thinking it must mean something specific to me, but I can't think what, ha ha!

Anyway, maybe it's time I went for a bath and then had a look at Boris's links.

Best wishes,
Mark
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Re: Good reads, poems and quotes

Post by Boris Bike » 15 Aug 2011 00:05

I assume in the unhappy version the dog is slain and only then does Llewllyn discover what happened?

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Re: Good reads, poems and quotes

Post by freedom1 » 15 Aug 2011 06:32

Just catching up here...

Joanne.. is that your poem? Its very lovely, and touches me deeply. I would love to post it on my blog at some stage ..... if you would be happy with that, or if its not yours, tell me who wrote it.

And hoping you and yer spotty knickers are jumpin' about merrily.... <:)>
"Let me respectfully remind you,
Life and death are of supreme importance.
Time swiftly passes by and opportunity is lost.
Each of us should strive to awaken. . .
. . . awaken,
Take heed. Do not squander your life."

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Re: Good reads, poems and quotes

Post by Mark. » 15 Aug 2011 09:08

Hi Boris - yes, that's what happens in the other version. I must be getting sentimental in my old age!
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Re: The Book Club

Post by Boris Bike » 22 Aug 2011 18:59

No More Hangovers by Allen Carr - a review

Got this today, just finished reading it.

The first thing to note is that it is a very short book. There's 120 pages of actual content, the page size is small but nevertheless there is still masses of white space on almost every page. I finished the whole thing in under an hour. But the book only costs £3.50 from Amazon.

Secondly, the actual advice given about stopping is present on only about ten to fifteen pages (again, all with very little text on them), mostly at the end. The rest of the book is really persuading us that alcohol is not good for us or trying to explain that it is not enjoyable to drink, that it's unnecessary to drink, that we are being tricked by alcohol.

One bit of advice in the closing pages I found very good was: when you give up, if you feel like crap then don't think to yourself "I feel crap because I've stopped drinking". Instead think "I wouldn't feel this crap if I'd never started drinking."

There is nothing on the dangers of going cold turkey or about tapering off. His advice is to have one final glass of alcohol, preferably a big glass of spirits - one you don't like the taste of - as a form of closure.

If you fancy analysing why you might have a problem with drink, you'll get no help from Carr. Carr says that alcohol is a poison (true, but a point that Carr makes quite a number of times) and says something like "if you were shot by a poison arrow, would you worry what direction it came from? Who shot it? What the arrow was made of? No. You'd focus on getting the poison out of your system." I would argue that, yes, you get the poison out. But once it's out you might want to know who fired the arrow so that you can avoid them or hit them with a frying pan at some later date in the hope that you don't get hit by another poison arrow.

So, it's a pretty slight book. It did make me think (in a good way) a bit at certain points, though. If the book cost as much as most other self-help books I'd be giving it a right kicking. But at £3.50 I think it's money well spent. It's an easy read, so if you're feeling delicate or have a headache, you should still find it easy going. If you put your continued drinking down to specific issues, though, then it's infinitely improbable that you will find a page in here that will address your particular issue and, even if it does, it will be dealt with in 20 words. Detailed it ain't.

In summary: recommended for the price but may well need bolstering with other forms of support (such as BE! or another more detailed book) .

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Re: The Book Club

Post by Mark. » 27 Aug 2011 14:17

I hope this doesn't look too much like advertising, but I've just come across an absolutely incredible advance in information storage-and-retrieval technology and I thought I'd share it with you before they catch on.

My own stepdaughter is astounded that such a device has become possible to produce within her lifetime and is now desperate to find out where she can get hold of one. Certainly, there aren't any currently available in Pictishtown's shopping centre, although I believe there may be one or two stockists in some of the UK's larger cities...

Enjoy! :ugeek: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :D

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YhcPX1wV ... e=youtu.be" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
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Re: The Book Club

Post by George » 27 Aug 2011 14:48

Can you get them by email?
“Now I’m sober and I realize, I didn’t drink to escape the world, I drank to escape myself”
― Phil Volatile, Crushed Black Velvet

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Re: Good reads, poems and quotes

Post by KraftyKat » 05 Sep 2011 10:34

For those times when we temporarily lose our way:

Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.
- Confucius
One reason I don't drink is that I want to know when I am having a good time.
Nancy Astor

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Re: Good reads, poems and quotes

Post by farthing » 06 Sep 2011 21:27

I love that. Trouble is in the past I've willingly fallen knowing that I'd rise again the next day. :oops:

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Re: The Book Club

Post by Boris Bike » 07 Oct 2011 18:08

If you like pop psychology, Winker, I can recommend "Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us". Turns out it isn't money...

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