COVID-19 Support & Chat

Specific emotional or mental health problems, like anxiety, depression, insomnia, confidence etc. Along with bodily health, exercise, nutrition.
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Winkler
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Re: COVID-19 Support & Chat

Post by Winkler »

Surveys show a lot less young people taking up smoking which of course is great for prevention of smoking related diseases although that won’t show in the statistics for 20 years
A huge success for public health policies nevertheless
The same attitude ie tax, sadly, towards alcohol, sugar and junk/fast food could work wonders on obesity and alcohol related harm and deaths but successive governments have not committed - some people would say political parties depend too heavily on those manufacturers contributing to party funds
I’m hopeful the reduction of private car use, particularly in urban areas, may contribute to Increased population daily exercise But again, will take big government investment
Maybe the revenue from tax on the evils
In a perfect world :)
Glad u feel better - I do too ;)
Truth waits for eyes unclouded by longing - Lao Tzu

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Wilson
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Re: COVID-19 Support & Chat

Post by Wilson »

Winkler wrote:
22 May 2020 07:27
You smoke Wilson? :?:
Not anymore.
9 or so years smoke free.

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Winkler
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Re: COVID-19 Support & Chat

Post by Winkler »

Wilson wrote:
22 May 2020 16:58
[quote=Winkler post_id=920542 time=<a href="tel:1590128874">1590128874</a> user_id=16503]
You smoke Wilson? :?:
Not anymore.
9 or so years smoke free.
[/quote]
Good man ;)?

No, that imagery of 2 M doesn’t help me one bit either newt!
Truth waits for eyes unclouded by longing - Lao Tzu

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Topcat
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Re: COVID-19 Support & Chat

Post by Topcat »

Things are returning to some sort of normality in my neck of the woods now. Went into town today for some shopping and a walk along the seafront. More people around and more shops opening up (M&S even have a sale on) :lol: Must admit anxiety level was getting pretty high with the uncertainty/restrictions. Just hope the improvements continue for everyone and that the dentists open up again before we all start pulling our own teeth out :roll:
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Shadowlad
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Re: COVID-19 Support & Chat

Post by Shadowlad »

Hello campers ! <:)>

I understand about the uncertainty/restrictions TC because places are starting to open here too. I keep eating chips just because of the novelty of all the fish and chip shops being open ! Also how to stop going the wrong way with the arrows in the shops ? There is a worry that Tesco security are going to cart me off in handcuffs soon :? :lol:

Hope all are ok and enjoying the better weather xx
Life is 10% what happens to us and 90% how we react to it.

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Topcat
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Re: COVID-19 Support & Chat

Post by Topcat »

Oh the arrows in the supermarkets Nicky (w) I'm always finding myself going the wrong way too :lol:
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Shadowlad
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Re: COVID-19 Support & Chat

Post by Shadowlad »

(w) :lol: <:)>
Life is 10% what happens to us and 90% how we react to it.

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Mark.
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Re: COVID-19 Support & Chat

Post by Mark. »

The WHO went right off the boil after Quadrophenia, if you ask me :roll: ;)
"I once thought that growing up *meant* smoking and drinking. It looked so good, but I don't want to die from it."
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Mark.
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Re: COVID-19 Support & Chat

Post by Mark. »

(::) ;)? Me too <:)>
"I once thought that growing up *meant* smoking and drinking. It looked so good, but I don't want to die from it."
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Saturn
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Re: COVID-19 Support & Chat

Post by Saturn »

Hi all

I have just found this thread although see that it no longer appears to be very active.

How are people coping with the situation? I am in the UK and non essential shops were allowed to reopen today. The virus is by no means under control here though, although cases are decreasing.

For the first two months of lockdown I was in a terrible state of high anxiety. Adrenaline pumped through me almost all day long and I would wake in the early hours then just lie there worrying and catastrophising. Over the last few weeks this has thankfully subsided to a large degree. I am still very worried as I am sure many people are, but it is no longer manifesting in such intense and uncontrollable anxiety.

I just really hope that a vaccine and/or effective treatment is found soon, so that people stop dying, we can stop living in fear and life can get back to some semblance of normality.

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Mark.
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Re: COVID-19 Support & Chat

Post by Mark. »

Saturn wrote:
16 Jun 2020 00:58
I just really hope that a vaccine and/or effective treatment is found soon, so that people stop dying, we can stop living in fear and life can get back to some semblance of normality.
I totally agree with that, Saturn ;)? And I recognise your description of the stages we've been through during the crisis.

It's been a profoundly interesting/strange psychological experience for us all, and truly getting back to normal (in our own minds as much as physically out and about in the world) will take time.

When did all this begin for us - March? It feels like a year ago at least since people were running around like blue-arsed flies, buying up all the bog roll and pasta!

Let's hope we really are beginning to get over it now, and, as you say, that a vaccine is found soon ;)? <:)>
"I once thought that growing up *meant* smoking and drinking. It looked so good, but I don't want to die from it."
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Saturn
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Re: COVID-19 Support & Chat

Post by Saturn »

Hi Mark

I think it might have been the end of February when all the panic buying started ramping up. But yes it feels like ages ago.

I had finally managed to quit drinking last September and was just getting used to sobriety and then the rug was pulled with this situation. I have not started drinking again, but have really struggled with the situation. Today I have felt more depressed than ever and a real yearning to go back to life before. I know it sounds trivial when so many people have died and I am grateful that neither me nor any loved ones have so far been afflicted. I guess I just feel a combination of fear of getting it and sadness that so much has changed in how we have to live and it's not for the better in terms of human interaction.

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Mark.
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Re: COVID-19 Support & Chat

Post by Mark. »

No, it's not trivial at all, Saturn. This situation has been worse for some than others, but it's been really hard work for us all, hasn't it? Just keeping out of people's way is exhausting, for a start - both mentally and physically.

I have good days and bad days, but often now I just feel a deep impatient longing for life to be normal again. It will be, but it may take a little while longer yet.

Very well done for not drinking - that would have complicated things even further, in many ways, emotionally and financially and so on. Well done for staying sober ;)?

I hope you won't feel too depressed. Keep talking here, if it helps <:)>
"I once thought that growing up *meant* smoking and drinking. It looked so good, but I don't want to die from it."
~ Marianne Faithfull

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Saturn
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Re: COVID-19 Support & Chat

Post by Saturn »

Thanks Mark

Yes this is what I feel - a deep impatient longing. It is especially pronounced every morning when I wake and the realisation that it will be another day of it hits me. Of course it could get worse, the onset of symptoms could arrive, but each morning I know the situation is unlikely to have improved by nightfall.

I have actually woken up today in a state of anxiety again fearing the worst case scenario that this 'New Abnormal' as I call it is here to stay. I fear neither me or my partner working again. I fear being unable to adapt. He has left his job as a labourer as we live with his 90 year old mother who is obviously high risk. My contract finished 2 weeks ago and I don't know how I will find something else in this climate. It would have to be something I could do from home because of his mother unless I move out. We can get by for a while but not forever. I fear us eventually being forced out into the world to work and the risk of then contracting the disease. Every day they seem to find out something more hideous about it. It seems even if you survive you could be severely impaired for life. I also fear a life spent cowering at home as much as possible in order to try to avoid this fate. I fear the freedom to just throw open the front door and walk out without fear, to mix freely with others, to socialise normally with family and friends, never returning.

Essentially life just seems pretty terrifying right now. Are you OK work wise? I know many people aren't obviously having seen their livelihoods simply vanish overnight.

I hope you are right that life will return to at least some semblance of normality. The only way is a vaccine really isn't it, or perhaps a very effective treatment. I can't see that the virus will just disappear, well I don't think any experts think it will

My drinking days seem a world way now, even though it's less than a year. I would not want to be trapped in that horrible cycle again, and yet I still find myself yearning for the past, any part of the past, where this current situation was not the awful reality.

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Mark.
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Re: COVID-19 Support & Chat

Post by Mark. »

There is a lot to fear, Saturn. I suppose the trick is to be aware of the factors that might make the future potentially difficult, but also to bear in mind that they may not happen. Or, if they do happen, we'll deal with them - we always do, one way or another. Try not to allow fears of the future ruin the present, as imperfect as it is.

As for work, I'm very lucky in that for some of the week I work for a supermarket. In terms of social distancing it's hard work, but it's secure. I think my own (very small) business, mothballed for months now, may have bitten the bullet, though... However, I'm seeing this as an opportunity to get on with a different project I've been postponing for a long time.

Your words, with which I agree entirely, have reminded me of some advice I was given years ago. I'll try and dig it out and post it here in a minute ;)?



EDIT: Here's the quote I was thinking of. I don't know if it will help. I hope so. It's been useful to me. It comes from a guy called Timothy Radcliffe, who I saw give a lecture years ago. He said that he'd once had a colleague who had a sign in his office that read: "Don't worry - it might not happen!!!"

Radcliffe went in one day and changed it to:

"Don't worry - it might well happen. But it won't be the end of the world."

That was Radcliffe's take on the world, and now it helps that it's mine too: crap may or may not happen, but if it does, we'll deal with it, one way or another ;)? <:)>
"I once thought that growing up *meant* smoking and drinking. It looked so good, but I don't want to die from it."
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Saturn
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Re: COVID-19 Support & Chat

Post by Saturn »

Well I suppose ultimately there's no choice but to deal with any crap that happens. I know it is best to try not to stress too much about stuff that hasn't yet happened though. But there is so much uncertainty involved in this current situation and also we don't know when it will end, or even if it will. Hopefully it will obviously. But yes letting fear of the future ruin the present is a shame. My anxiety/depression has kind of got other ideas though, so I am going to start some anti depressants today. I didn't want to start taking medication, especially as the mental issues are situational, but I think there is little choice if I am continue to function and do anything constructive like think about how to get another job.

Thank you for working in the supermarket to keep us all fed. I have thought about all the key workers putting themselves out there while I hide at home. I should not really be complaining when I am benefitting from other people who are putting themselves at risk. Hopefully the risk is minimal and every precaution is taken.

The numbers are coming down aren't they, so hopefully they will continue in that direction and the much talked of second wave will not materialise.

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Mark.
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Re: COVID-19 Support & Chat

Post by Mark. »

Saturn wrote:
17 Jun 2020 14:52
My anxiety/depression has kind of got other ideas though, so I am going to start some anti depressants today. I didn't want to start taking medication, especially as the mental issues are situational, but I think there is little choice if I am continue to function and do anything constructive like think about how to get another job.
How is that going now, Saturn? I think you are wise to try them, and I hope they help ;)?
Saturn wrote:
17 Jun 2020 14:52
Hopefully the risk is minimal and every precaution is taken.
Mostly I think that these have been accounted for - although there has been a lot of 'make it up as we go along' from management over the last few months. However, I can't blame them for that - we are dealing with an unprecedented challenge, after all. Also, I have to admit that whilst some things at work feel hard/difficult, I do really appreciate being there; partly because I like to help out and be doing something, but partly (and I feel grateful for this) because it allows a sense of normality to continue. I get up, I go to work. I find my days off a little harder, I must admit. However, I did go for a good long walk in the sunshine yesterday on my own :)

Your post made me realise how we are all, as individuals, experiencing this period differently. My adult son, due to his medical condition, must self-isolate. In years to come, he and I will remember lockdown differently. I'll remember panic-buying and lots of overtime (due to wisely isolating colleagues) and he'll remember being in the house and keeping in touch with friends and family and reading about the whole situation online. It struck me as odd how we're essentially going through exactly the same moment in history and yet having to deal with it in entirely different ways!
Saturn wrote:
17 Jun 2020 14:52
The numbers are coming down aren't they, so hopefully they will continue in that direction and the much talked of second wave will not materialise.
Yes, and let's hope that everything keeps going in the right direction. It will end, but we just need to keep our patience going a little while longer ;)? <:)>
"I once thought that growing up *meant* smoking and drinking. It looked so good, but I don't want to die from it."
~ Marianne Faithfull

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Saturn
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Re: COVID-19 Support & Chat

Post by Saturn »

Hi Mark

I have not started the anti depressants. Some one posted in a FB group that they are very difficult to get off of. I don't really want another addiction as such. So I will leave it for now.

The depression is purely situational. I was not depressed prior to this. Even though there is obviously an element of danger now for you in going to work that was not there previously, I understand about it helping you maintain a sense of normality. I am really struggling to adapt to a life that has suddenly become a severely curtailed Groundhog Day. I have just woken up now at 5.30am.and like every morning I feel a deep sense of dread that it is another day of this with no end in sight. Of course I am grateful to still have avoided the virus, and hope we continue to do so, but then the constant underlying fear of getting it is a huge part of life now. I didn't actually realise before now you could be terrified and bored sh*tless at the same time.

I was just thinking about the concept of having something to look forward to. In my drinking years, consumption of alcohol was what I would look forward to on an almost daily basis. That was obviously not a healthy thing to eagerly anticipate, but it did serve that function. When I stopped drinking I learned to look forward to relaxing in the evenings after work, and then look forward to weekends. We didn't usually do much, go for a meal, wander around town browsing charity shops,.go.for a walk in the park. But retaining myself to look forward to simple pleasures instead of drinking was part of my recovery.

Now I don't really know what I should look forward to except this situation ending, but we don't know when or if that will be. We do go for walks and I agree they are very good for assisting mental wellbeing. But really there seems nothing much to look forward to now and a lot to dread potentially happening. Maybe life was just too easy before. We certainly had an easy run in many ways. But it is certainly hard now even if we are still well and nothing has happened as such.

How is your son coping with self isolation then? Will he continue it for as long as the situation continues? Does he go out at all for exercise? I have some health history that means I am probably at a somewhat elevated risk, but I don't know how much. Also I said about living with my partner's 90 year old mother so we need to be extra careful for her sake. And my partner is pushing 60 and a former smoker so he shouldn't be blasé either. We do go for walks as I said being cautious but that's about it. I really don't know what will happen if this continues on and on though. We won't both be able to hide away forever.

I don't know, I think I just constantly feel that deep. Impatient longing for normality to return that you mentioned. And waking up to yet another day of it not truly seeming any nearer is getting harder to deal with each day. I am grateful to not be ill touch wood of course I am. So then I feel guilty for not being fully content, although of course elimination of the fear of getting it would be the greatest relief. I think that's what it boils down to, the primary relief of no longer having to fear getting it, or at least dying/getting extremely sick from it, and then the secondary relief of being able to throw open the front door and resume life freely as before. It's so strange that life that was taken for granted now seems an unattainable dream. Also thinking how alcohol not only provided something to look forward to, but the taking of the first drink was experienced as relief. Now my mind is consumed with anticipating the overwhelming relief that would come with the situation being resolved and our old way of life resuming. But unlike drinking, where the relief, albeit an unhealthy one, could be provided almost daily, this relief is so one that is totally unattainable. I know restrictions are being eased but in my opinion this is for purely economic reasons since the virus is by no means under control. I understand the need to restart economic activity, but given our overall household situation we won't be rushing out to any non essential places that reopen. I will only feel OK if there is a vaccine or effective treatment and if there never is, well I don't even want to think about it.

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DannyD
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Re: COVID-19 Support & Chat

Post by DannyD »

I've been thinking about your post since I read it earlier this morning Saturn.

I think it's important that we have something to look forward to. For me, it's part of my routine. In Normal Time, I work evenings. I don't always enjoy it, and there are some very dark, wet, cold evenings during the autumn months, when it's a real effort to make myself go to work. But, like or dislike, work is something that I looked forward to - even if it was (is!) the more basic looking forward to finishing work.

At the moment, one of my local pubs are doing roast dinners. Big plates (which do 2 meals for me) cost £8.00. A choice of crumbles and ice cream/custard are an extra £2.00. Delivery is free. I live on my own, and wouldn't bother to cook a roast dinner for myself. I certainly couldn't make it for £8/10. I order on Tuesday, and really look forward to my Sunday roast. It's a highlight of my weekends. It's a focus for staying sober (really won't enjoy the food if I'm either drunk or hungover).

But I can understand. It's almost a depression caused by the boredom of Groundhog Day, and I think the solution to that, is to find Something To Do. Perhaps start to write a journal? Have a look to see if there might be an online writing course? Start writing some fictional stories? Your writing is very easy to read.
be selfish in your sobriety.

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Re: COVID-19 Support & Chat

Post by SoberBoots »

I have not started the anti depressants. Some one posted in a FB group that they are very difficult to get off of.
It depends what you've been prescribed Saturn. Generally GP's are extremely cautious of prescribing anything remotely addictive. Olease don't be guided by what someone's said on Facebook! It's true that if you've been on a medication for a while and want to stop, it is best to wean off slowly rather than just stop, but this shouldn't blind you to the enormous benefits - in some situations, anti-depressants can be transformational. Feel free to message me.
The best time to plant a tree was 30 years ago. The second best time is today.

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